Our Teddy Bear's Journey

Theodore was born with renal failure. This is his story.

Feeding Tube Awareness Week

on February 10, 2015

This week is ALSO Feeding Tube Awareness Week.

I thought I’d take a moment this week to talk about Teddy’s tube.

Why does Teddy have a feeding tube?

Kidney disease often makes you feel nauseous. Perhaps because of this, or perhaps for other reasons, babies with kidney failure often don’t eat enough. Additionally, Teddy had high-output renal failure, which is a completely nonmedical way of saying that he peed out waaaay more than he should, and his body would literally pee itself into dehydration. To counter this, he required more intake than a typical baby – about twice what a typical baby would get, actually. We tried without the tube for about a month (from NICU discharge at 1 month until he was about 2 months), but during that time, he was chronically dehydrated, he was not gaining weight (and ultimately started losing weight), and our whole day revolved around Feeding The Baby. Or Trying To Feed The Baby. And meds. Forcing Meds Into My Baby. Forcing Breastmilk Into My Baby. Constantly constantly constantly stressing because he wasn’t taking in enough. When our doctor called to suggest it was time for a feeding tube, I agreed basically immediately (much to her surprise, lol). I don’t regret for a second.

Sometimes I wish we’d started off with the tube right away… but I’m ultimately glad we tried it without first. We tried. We failed. But we tried.

 

Why doesn’t Teddy eat orally now? Isn’t everything “fixed” since his transplant?

Teddy never really ate orally. He continued to use a bottle part time for a few months after his gtube was put in, but ultimately came to rely on the tube more and more. Ultimately, I don’t remember when but it was well before he turned 1, he stopped eating orally altogether, and actually developed a pretty intense oral aversion. Kissing him on the lips caused him to gag. Putting toys to his mouth caused him to gag.

He was also vomiting basically continuously during this time. (He’s had very very few days in his life where he hasn’t vomited – and most of the days with no vomits have been days he’s been on TPN – IV nutrition – while letting his gut rest.)

So… Oral Aversion.   Weak Mouth Muscles.     No recollection of how to handle food in his mouth.     Food is legitimately scary to him.

He’s made a LOT of progress since transplant. He is feeling better. He WANTS to eat. He has mostly figured out HOW to eat. He doesn’t gag any more. He puts everything in his mouth. (toys, I mean) But some textures and flavors of foods are still just too much. And some/many foods, he just can’t physically chew and move around in his mouth.

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