Our Teddy Bear's Journey

Theodore was born with renal failure. This is his story.

Teddy Update

It’s been a while! Sorry! But things have been going fairly smoothly.

Teddy was admitted to the hospital for dehydration in mid-December. His chronic diarrhea combined with an increase in vomiting (probably a GI virus) to result in an almost total inability to absorb any water through his GI tract. I have no idea why this happens, but it does. He reaches a point where any fluid I give him, orally or through his tube, either runs directly through him or is vomited back up immediately. So he needed a few days of IV hydration and he was back to his regular self again.

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This was the afternoon before we drove over. He just wanted to snuggle Genna.

We had a great Christmas at home, with everyone well, it was awesome! I evidently didn’t take pictures.

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Teddy locked himself into the bedroom. That was awesome. This is him just sitting holding a dolly, wrapped up in the rug, waiting for us to get him out.

A few days after Christmas, I noticed Teddy’s hands had suddenly developed a bright red bumpy rash between his fingers. It appeared to be itchy. We assumed he’d gotten into something, but when it didn’t improve after a few days, we went to see the pediatrician, and then the dermatologist.

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Both considered but dismissed scabies and hand foot and mouth disease, and both said probably eczema, take this cream. But the cream wasn’t helping and it quickly reached a point where Teddy was so miserable that he was up most of the night crying, screaming, and scratching. It spread to his feet, legs, torso, and back. Then they started to crack and peel. After seeing some pictures, nephrology agreed it was *probably* eczema, but there were definitely other possibilities, including some kind of scary (though unlikely) ones, that are unique to transplant patients. This is why I usually run everything past nephrology – because neither our pediatrician (who we love) nor most of the specialty doctors in Des Moines have much experience with transplant kids.

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So they had us come see the dermatologist who sees their kids in Iowa City, and she confirmed it IS eczema (a particular type called dishydrotic eczema) and it’s unusual to see it in kids his age, particularly immune suppressed ones. AND she said that the two expensive creams we’d been using would not do any good at all because they’re not nearly strong enough. She gave us the mack daddy of topical creams and said if that didn’t help, we’d try an oral steroid. After just a few days of use, it *seems* to be helping his hands, but not his feet, so we’ll see. He’s still up a lot at night itching and crying.

After dermatology, Teddy had his first routine Echo, which we were checking for heart wall thickening as a result of his high blood pressure. The wait for that was *forever* but all three kids hung in there really well – I was quite proud of them. And though we thought Teddy might need to be sedated to get a good enough look at his heart, he actually just laid there all perfect. It was amazing.

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Last for the day was our clinic appointment with nephrology. They’re really happy with how he’s doing! Some of his labs continue to be bizarrely “off,” but they’re not too much off, so we’re calling it good. His blood pressure seems to be well controlled. And they don’t need to see him for THREE months! Whoohoo! We’ll continue to get labs monthly or more frequently (we’re still trying to get that prograf level under control), but we don’t have to make the drive until April!

She also mentioned that in some kids Prograf can cause an overall heightened allergic response, and you start to see kids who get eczema, EoE, allergies, etc. as a result of the prograf. (Prograf is his main immune suppression. The GI doctor thinks he might have EoE, and obviously he now has eczema.) There is another med we could switch him to – one that I find appealing because it has a much lower cancer risk associated with it, but it’s not as well-studied in kids. Prograf is sort of the Old School standard med, and the other med (Rapamune) is newer. So we’re going to think about it for a while, do more research, and we’ll see. 🙂

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And this is just for fun. Teddy loves pockets now. And he has NO concept of relative size.

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