How can I help?

I love this post. I particularly identify with this quote:

The times I have felt the most taken care of and touched by people’s service has been when they went ahead and just served us how they felt led. Many times after the fact we realize that it is exactly what we needed, even if it was just a drink from Starbucks or a run to the grocery store for us. These impact us more than you know. … If you feel led to serve a family, voice how you would like to serve them and then do it. Don’t wait on them to ask for it, because most likely they will not.

I know I personally have moved to asking people if I can do something specific that is within my ability to do and that I think they would appreciate; or that I would appreciate if I were in their place. “Can I bring you a coffee?” or “I’m going to the store this afternoon and would be happy to drop something by – what do you need from the store?” The person can still turn me down if it’s not a good fit (opening the door to, “is there something else you need?”) but I’m not putting it on them to come up with what they need.

This is partially because I’ve been so particularly touched by those who’ve messaged me while I’m in the hospital with Teddy, “I’m driving through Iowa City and I’d love to bring you something – what can I bring?” My answers have varied from Coffee to fresh fruit to french fries from McDonalds. It would feel awkward for me to send someone to the store on my behalf normally. I would not answer “is there anything I can do?” with “can you go to the grocery store and buy me some fresh fruit and some frozen Hot Pockets breakfast sandwiches.” Hello, bossy much? But when the question is phrased such that the person makes it clear they’re already planning to go to the store for me, but merely want to be directed in what specifically I’d like, it’s easier. (And people have generally figured out that what I mostly need when we’re in the hospital is provisions from outside the hospital, since I typically am not able to leave the building.)

 

And her #3 – Don’t Minimize. I’ve found that many parents of medical or special needs kids tend to talk more to other parents with their child’s same diagnosis, because that’s a safe place where most people will say something like “oh, crap” or “that sucks” instead of “oh, it’ll be fine.” At the same time, an “it’ll probably all be ok” response from these other parents-in-the-know is much more reassuring because it’s usually based on fact, not wishful thinking. I’ve learned there are people in my life with whom I don’t share a whole lot because it hurts to hear only denial (or blame) in return. Don’t be that person.

 

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